See No Evil

This is the rule for all contractors if you want to succeed.

Half will be your technical ability but the other half (or more actually) will be how you fit in and get along with others. To this end you must:

  • See no evil – never look for the bad in others or negative situations
  • Hear no evil – don’t listen in when the conversation is about others
  • Speak no evil – and of course never criticize others

Best of luck with that.

Paul Browning

13 Responses to “See No Evil”

  1. Hi
    As you say the above should apply in the work place, however should it not apply to everyday life, as they say treat others as you would like to be treated yourself?

    Robert

    • It certainly should apply in everything we do. Have you ever wondered why it’s so easy to see the faults in others, and feel compelled to react to those “faults”, but so difficult to see and acknowledge the good?

  2. Paul these are words of wisdom! “Speak no evil” is especially important, even if you can’t always avoid seeing and hearing evil. I find it very annoying (and disappointing) when a contractor “bad mouths” the work of others who have gone before him or her. In doing so they are also criticizing *my* judgment in having the “bad” work done. What’s the point of making a customer feel stupid? Just do the job efficiently and do it right. You’ll come out a winner!

  3. I agree with Joe. Here’s another point. If you find yourself “speaking evil” about jobs you’ve done at other businesses, you’ll leave your current customer wondering just what it is you’re saying about *them* to others. You want your customers to trust you and invite you back. Keep your conversation professional and focused on the job at hand.

  4. Paul these are words of wisdom! “Speak no evil” is especially important, even if you can’t always avoid seeing and hearing evil. I find it very annoying (and disappointing) when a contractor “bad mouths” the work of others who have gone before him or her. In doing so they are also criticizing *my* judgment in having the “bad” work done. What’s the point of making a customer feel stupid? Just do the job efficiently and do it right. You’ll come out a winner!

  5. Hi Paul!

    I agree with you. The above there points plays a vital role in any organizations, and also applied to individuals.

    Kind Regards

    Naresh

  6. I thought I had submitted this but must have missed a step so will try again. I agree with Joe. And here’s another point. If you find yourself “speaking evil” about jobs you’ve done at other businesses, you’ll leave your current customer wondering just what it is you’re saying about *them* to others. You want your customers to trust you and invite you back. Keep your conversation professional and focused on the job at hand.

  7. Excellent advice. Short and sweet. Neither see, hear, nor speak evil. Instead maintain a friendly but professional approach toward al your clients or co-workers. You’re much more likely to get ahead that way.

  8. So I’m in a very holiday, good cheer frame of mind, and wish for all of us that we will both act on, and be acted on, in this way. What a great year it would be if we all could strive to see, hear, and speak no evil. Happy holidays!

  9. If the people you work with are a little stressed out from the holidays or are skipping out early to take care of personal business, as a contractor, just keep smiling and getting tye job donewithout comment. Your efforts will be remembered next time there’s a job to fill.

  10. What do they say in math class? Necessary but not sufficient? Technical ability is necessary but not sufficient to succeed as a contractor.

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